Tag Archives: Sculpture

Install 28 April 2014

On the day of the installation William Danby had arranged transport of the sculpture at 9.15am from Studio 11 to the Council House building.  We only had the van facilities for a limited time, but managed to fit the entire sculpture (in several sections) in one trip.

Day of Installation: Transportation of Sculpture. Photograph by Helanie Moore
Day of Installation: Transportation of Sculpture. Photograph by Helanie Moore

Lee McDonald traveled with William to the Council House to transport the sculpture.  I was the only other person with a car on the day so I dropped Jess Bent and Kath Howard with the wall pieces to the Council House from Studio 11 first.  I then, over several trips transported the plinths and smaller view-finding devices with Maddy Crossley and Sarah Hughes, as well as tools/paint etc which we required.

Will, Lee and Maddy set about putting the sculpture together and fortunately all of our preparation and measurements had paid off because the sections fitted together perfectly and created no obstruction to the lighting.  This was the first time we had actually seen the sculpture in one piece!

Install of Sculpture: Photo by Helanie Moore
Install of Sculpture: Photograph by Helanie Moore

Jess and Kath hung the wall pieces using wire, eyelet hooks and picture hooks that wouldn’t damage the wood panels.  Tony Davey expressed particular interest in the wall pieces and said that he may be interested in buying one.  Following a brief discussion with our tutor Edith Doove (also present during the install), she felt that we should look into charging for prints and whether we would be able to also produce framed prints if people showed an interest in purchasing them.  We later decided to charge £25 for limited edition prints and £35 for framed prints.  Kath Howard and Jess Bent took on the responsibility of recording orders.

3 of the installed wall pieces. Photograph by Helanie Moore
3 of the installed wall pieces. Photograph by Helanie Moore

Myself and Sarah prepared the plinths (filled gaps/sanded) and painted them over dust sheets to prevent any damage to the marble floor.  After consulting with Councillor Penberthy it was decided that we would not place rope between each plinth around the sculpture because a) it would prevent people interacting with the sculpture, b) the plinths marked out a square shape around the sculpture – an invisible barrier and c) the sculpture was very visible and it was unlikely that people would walk directly into it.

Preparing plinths for install. Photograph by Helanie Moore
Preparing plinths for install. Photograph by Helanie Moore

The whole installation did not take long and we were finished by the early afternoon.  As mentioned, we had tried to prepare for all eventualities which had put us in good stead.  It was a great sense of satisfaction and relief to have the artworks installed successfully and to see that the hard work had paid off.

Install of Sculpture. Photograph by Helanie Moore
Complete Installation. Photograph by Helanie Moore
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Final Preparations

With only a few days left before we were due to install the artwork we still had quite a few things to do.

Kath Howard and Jess Bent attached the grey frames to the images with a glue gun and staples. Unfortunately, the fixtures were a little loose but would be suitable to hang in the Council House during the exhibition duration.  If we were to make more framed images for requested orders we would pva glue the frames to the images, clamp them and staple them straight away to make them stronger.

We also needed four plinths which we asked Martin France, Fine Art Technician to help us with.  Martin did a fantastic job of the plinths in the limited time we had.

Maddy Crossley and Jess Bent made the smaller viewfinders to sit on the plinths using foam board, gaffer tape, reflective tinted film and grey paint.  Although these pieces were not as polished as the viewfinder and wall pieces, he did not matter as they would probably be handled quite a lot during the exhibition.

Maddy Crossley working on smaller viewfinders. Image by Kath Howard
Maddy Crossley working on smaller viewfinders. Image by Kath Howard
Looking through one of the smaller viewfinders. Image by Kath Howard
Looking through one of the smaller viewfinders. Image by Kath Howard

The main sculpture had quite a lot of finishing touches to be undertaken.  These included covering the base with canvas and painting it to give a cleaner finish and making the end rotating piece and attaching it to the main body with a cross frame.  Lee McDonald was a fantastic team-player and stayed all day – sometimes until 7pm to work on the sculpture and get it finished.  We were really happy with the resulting piece and were nearly ready for install.

Final preparations to sculpture - end piece in the foreground and base to the back left of the photograph. Image by Kath Howard.
Final preparations to sculpture – end piece in the foreground and base to the back left of the photograph. Image by Kath Howard.

 

Development of Sculpture & Wall Pieces

During the week commencing 14 April 2014 we began to make significant progress on the sculpture and wall pieces.  We had managed to weight balance the main octagonal structure on the pivot and were starting to feel more confident with the piece.

Weight balancing the sculpture. Image by William Danby
Weight balancing the sculpture. Image by William Danby

Kath Howard and Jess Bent had now spray mounted the prints (printed at PCA’s Creation) to the hardboard which Martin France, Fine Art Technician had cut out. We were all really pleased with the results and received some positive comments from our peers.

Wall pieces in progress. Image by Kath Howard
Wall pieces in progress. Image by Kath Howard

We still needed to create a reflective quality to the inside of the sculpture and although we initially thought about using the roll of window tint we had salvaged, we felt that this would perhaps not be reflective enough for the kaleidoscopic element.  Lee McDonald suggested buying some Mylar which is a reflective plastic sheeting.  We managed to buy some from a local shop and myself and Maddy Crossley cut and spray mounted it to the inside of each side of the octagonal viewfinder.

Part of the sculpture with the Mylar attached. Image by Kath Howard
Part of the sculpture with the Mylar attached. Image by Kath Howard

Although, we had initially been quite worried about whether we would manage to complete this project on time, we were now feeling really positive with how the artwork was coming along and I was quite proud of how well we were working together as a team.

 

Meeting with Judith Robinson & Neil Wressell

Following my email to Judith Robinson from the group re the proposal and risk assessment, we received a reply on 14 April 2014 as follows:

14 April 2014 email reply from Judith Robinson. Image available from: https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#apps/judith+robinson/14521f929273b137
14 April 2014 email reply from Judith Robinson. Image available from: https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/#apps/judith+robinson/14521f929273b137

There was quite a lot of aspects in Judith’s email – some of which could be easily answered.  However, as she was on leave until 22 April, we would not be able to discuss these queries until after she had returned.  This was particularly of concern to the group because her email mentioned that the install would be on 24 April and this would only leave us less than 2 days to rectify any issues. Fortunately our tutor Edith Doove contacted Judith to arrange a change of installation date to 28 April 2014 to give the group more time due to the studio being closed over the Easter break and our other assignment deadlines.  Furthermore Edith also arranged for Judith and Neil Wressell, Senior Conservator & Exhibitions Registrar at Plymouth City Council to visit Studio 11 on 22 April to discuss Judith’s email. During the meeting we covered the following points as per email:

1.  Please can you send us a diagram of the proposed sculpture, a list of materials, a wiring diagram and a weight estimate? :
Judith given plan (she couldnt open original attachment.
2. Please ensure that the electrics are PAT tested and that the work is sited adjacent to an electrical source. An electrical cover on a flex will not be sufficient in this space as the lighting is quite low and it is a mixed use space.
No electrics involved and measurements had already been taken (as per plan) to ensure the sculpture would not interfere with the lighting.
3. In terms of protecting the building, if you can provide a weight, we will then need to ascertain the load bearing capacity go the floor. A simple floor protection is probably advisable.
Adhesive carpet tiles were used on base of sculpture.
4. In terms of access for the sculpture, please ensure that you have walked the route with a tape measure and provide us with a plan of this. You will need to take account of width of doorways and height of light fittings etc as it is not a purpose built gallery space.
Measurements had already been taken of all the space including doorways and the sculpture would be delivered in sections to allow it to be easily transported through the building.
5. Barriers are mentioned on the risk assessment. Will you be supplying this or would you like us to supply, if we have enough available?  Please note that the standard distance for barriers is 80cms, so please can you check that there is enough space to accommodate this requirement.
We decided on Lee McDonald’s suggestion that we would create 4 plinths with smaller viewfinding devices on each.  These would be placed around the sculpture with stretch rope/wire attached between each plinth (Museum to provide this).
6. If the work is to be constructed on site, we will need the risk assessment to cover tools, methods etc.
Sculpture to be constructed on site: tools and materials include – drill, hammer, screwdriver, paint brushes, dust sheet, filler, palette knife.
7. Is the work kinetic? How will it be maintained? Are there elements that can be removed? Does it need to be turned on and off?
The work is of a kinetic nature but is manually moved as opposed to electronically motored and therefore does not need to be switched on and off.
It was also decided that the exhibition would be open to the public from 1.30pm-4pm every Friday and two group members would invigilate.
Judith and Neil seemed particularly intrigued by our sculpture which was still in pieces – so to speak but our plan seemed to give a better vision of how the piece would look once installed.  They also expressed their interest and pleasure in the wall pieces and could see that we had thought about the Council House space and the concept Th Future of Plymouth extremely well and were looking forward to seeing something different in the space.

Initial Stages of Sculpture & Wall Pieces

On 11 March 2014, I took over the sheets of MDF to the woodwork department in PCA’s main building. The MDF was salvaged from Studio 11 and to be cut into the eight sides of the octagonal viewfinder.

On 13 March 2014 myself, William Danby and Maddy Crossley started to put together the main structure of the viewerfinder by using small diamond shaped pieces of wood to attach each of the eight sides together.  These were then sanded down and painted.  We were originally going to buy blue paint to reflect Plymouth’s Ocean City but found some spare paint in Studio 11.

Initial Construction of main body of sculpture. Image by Helanie Moore
Initial Construction of main body of sculpture. Image by Helanie Moore

Myself and Maddy Crossley also marked out a scale drawing of the Council House foyer space using the floor plans I had designed and William’s prototype sculpture to see how it would look:

Scale plan of Council House foyer space and sculpture. Image by Helanie Moore
Scale plan of Council House foyer space and sculpture. Image by Helanie Moore

William designed and measured out the pivot structure which I took over to the woodwork department to be cut into an angled bridle join.

Design drawing by William Danby
Design drawing by William Danby
Pivot constructed by William Danby. Image by William Danby and edited by Helanie Moore
Pivot constructed by William Danby. Image by William Danby and edited by Helanie Moore

The sculpture was beginning to take shape and gave us an added boost and the motivation we needed to step up the pace on the sculpture and wall pieces.

More construction photographs can be found on The Future of Plymouth blog at

http://thefutureofplymouthexhibition.wordpress.com/the-construction/

Kath Howard and Jess Bent took control of wall pieces and costing – working out that eight 60″ x 60″ printed images mounted to hardboard would cost approximately £45-£50.  The images would be spray mounted to the hardboard and a wooden handmade frame would be attached to each one and painted grey to match the base of the sculpture as well as being a neutral colour that would not distract from the colours in the images.

During these early stages Jess Bent also produced a Risk Assessment for the exhibition:

Click here to view Risk Assessment produced by Jess Bent